2022

potato-planet
2022, Market chronicles

Potato market chronicle december 2022

Publication author: Jean-Marc Storper – SARL Maison Mendel Potato market chronicle december 2022 All market chronicles Here it is, the year of drought that reminds us of the famous year 1976. The revenge of irrigators, who seem to be doing rather well, on non-irrigators who are seeing their yields shrink, depending on the region and rainfall. And then there’s the galloping inflation of all inputs, plant protection products, equipment, etc., and ever longer lead times. And as if that weren’t enough, an unprecedented energy crisis is hitting packing stationspackaging stations and, above all, industry. Against this backdrop, prices are historically high for a harvest period, especially for versatile and fritable 7.5s from Beauce,Champagne or Picardie, with sizes that will be in demand throughout the year. Yields are lower, but growers have room in their fridges. Confident in the market, they delay sales, hoping for America. But happiness is not always around the corner!And the higher the prices, the lower the expected profits after storage. Prudence… Prices that are too high often attract outsiders and massive imports, as in a certain year 76…Will industry be able to pass on its costs? Will we have enough energy this winter? And will we or won’t we have a real winter? It’s hard to predict how the market will evolve in this unprecedented context. A word of advice: above all, select your buyers, who, given the sums involved, need to be as solvent as possible. That remains the sinews of war!Have a great season!

potato-planet
2022, Market chronicles

Potato market chronicle January 2022

Publication author: Frédéric Laviron – Roussineau SA Potato market chronicle January 2022 All market chronicles One thing is certain: French fresh potato production was, in terms of volume, correct. With this in mind, we’re all familiar with the adage: “Before Christmas, I can sell potatoes; after Christmas, I have to sell potatoes”. The industry’s responsiveness? While we can be pleased with the industry’s responsiveness in meeting the expectations of the new clientele in Eastern Europe, the fact remains that we are still short of our volumes on our traditional markets and partners on the Iberian Peninsula, demanding high tuber quality in a context of falling consumption. Of course, export volumes are buoyant, and I expect this to continue over the coming months in the East, as we await the opening of new markets such as Poland and the Czech Republic, unless the early potatoes from Greece, Egypt, Israel and, of course, Spain put a serious brake on our momentum. Don’t relax your efforts for the next harvest No, my main concern is that we shouldn’t relax our efforts, and that the outlook for the next harvest is hypothetical. Looking at recent years, we can see that demand is concentrated on high-quality, washable products and that, barring climatic incidents (as is the case this year in the East), we are reduced to producing, processing and selling only this type of quality and product.and products.What about a second-rate product? Many farmers today are wondering whether they should switch all or part of their acreage to more profitable or more reliable crops such as cereals, corn and, of course, processing potatoes. The technical constraints weighing on production, the difficulty of keeping potatoes in the fridge, the growing number of certifications, the demand for quality… all these factors combine to bring about a profound change in the face of future production at every level of the industry.